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Gameday: Braves (85-56) at Phillies (65-77)

Posted by Amanda Orr, Sun, September 08, 2013 12:34 PM | Comments: 18
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bmgndhhvp8d9dllfh3vnf8g5uAtlanta Braves (85-56) vs. Philadelphia Phillies (65-77) 

Paul Maholm (10-10, 4.41) vs. Cole Hamels (6-13, 3.50)

Time: 1:35 ET, Citizens Bank Park
TV: 
PHL17
Weather: 75, mostly sunny
Media: Twitter and Facebook

The Phillies are going for the sweep!  You heard that right.  The Phillies are in position to sweep the first place team in the National League East.  I wouldn’t say the Phillies are playing spoiler since it is inevitable that the Braves will clinch a playoff spot, but it certainty will push back their champagne celebration.

Cole Hamels is on the hill today.  With the way he has been pitching lately, it’s almost hard to believe that he had an ERA well over 4.00 at one point during this season.  Hamels left in the seventh inning during his last start because “he didn’t feel right.”  It’s said not to be an issue, but today will prove if there is anything affecting him.

Go Phillies!

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  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    Cole is 27th in The League in ERA.

    Of the 26 ahead of him, he has more innings (barely, in several instances) than all but one.

     
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    One of the earlier baseball cards I had was one that highlighted a homer Mantle hit at old Griffith Stadium that went 565 feet. That’s be 120 feet, or 40 yards further than that Gattis Goner. Maybe they don’t make tape measure like they used to, I dunno. All I know is Gattis creamated that ball, but despite recognizing that, it’s funny tpo read the press recactions ion twitter which kinda sound like they never saw a long homer before.

    Anyway,he jut decimated that, and it’ll be interesting to see if he gets swept up in trying to crush one next time. Hell, you only get so many chances to hit back to back 440 foot jobs.

     
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    We still have time to see Cesar Hernandez play a key role in a winning score or rally, but with Jimmy and Chase getting on twice today, his getting picked off and nailed at third on a Rollins hit were bummers. Be nice to see the kid pick it up and do some good before it’s over.

     
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    Dice K was killing Andrew, but finally gave up a run as he leaves tied at 1, B6.

    Whata guy to lose a bet over.

     
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    When Gattis homers, that’s not an earned run, right? He makes it look so easy, what’s so earned about it.

    The guy’s hit 3 balls today that must be close to 1200 feet, and maybe more.

     
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    I get going 2-0 on Uggla, trying to get him to bite, but then walking him to leadoff….yuck. Closing in on 100 pitches, control is showing tiring here.

     
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    Gattis hits 5th in the 9th.

    Ever heard of a 5 run homer?

    The Ruf homer means we’re looking at the 3rd straight young player hero, although Ruf is just new, not young.

    Off that development, Ruf should be doing the post game, and it all means that Murphy is going to get doused again.

    Remind me to buy stock in Murphy’s dry cleaner as hey have had a record sales weekend.

     
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    There are effective BJ’s, and ineffective BJ’s.

    For the first time since October, 1492, the Phils swept a series against starting lefties. That was the day Columbus discovered America, and stopped at the ballpark to see Jamie Moyer win the 3rd of 3 in a row,

    66-77.

    It’s a Tin Line Between Love and Hate.

    Go get ‘em.

     
    • Posts: 0 Ryne Duren

      Hey there Ken. Yo man Hernandez will be ok. I have a feeling that this kid is a pure hitter. Give him time pal.
      Now speaking of tape measure homers. I’m sure you can remember Richie (call me dick)Allen having some whoppers at Connie Mack. I do! Didn’t he have one over 500 feet and it was projected to go way further cause a building stopped it. He actually hit it over the roof.
      I also remember Wes Covington hitting the top of the lights in right center field. God knows how far that would’ve went if the light tower wasn’t there.

       
    • Posts: 0 Ryne Duren

      You got that totally wrong Ken. I think it was Sept. 1492 I remember I was just a kid. It seems like only yesterday my friend.

       
      • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

        I figured it was a waste of time to try to find out when they last swept a series started by all lefties as it wouldn’t happen this time, but damned if they didn’t do it, and it gave way to last time they swept the Braves, and all that good stuff.. Just a fun point that puts the accomplishment in perspective. You have to start against 3 lefties to do it anyway, which is no weekly occurrence, so I figured 1492 sounded about right.

         
  • Posts: 0 Bart Shart

    Mickey Mantle is credited with the longest home run at 634 feet. Covington could really hit some long shots.

    Moreover, great game by Cole Hamels. Looks like he has hit his stride.

     
    • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

      Bart,

      When you say The Mick is credited with a 634 foot smash, that’s different than saying The Mick hit a 634 foot shot.

      So are you questioning that?

      If you’d like, I can put on my Kojak hat and validate it by checking with some of the 20,000 women Wilt slept with.

      Lemme know if you want me to proceed.

       
      • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

        Shame Bart has chosen not to answer this so far. I’m in the mood for a lollipop, and Lord knows, I need a haircut.

         
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    Back in a simpler time, best known as when Baskin Robbins only sold chocolate, and that’s before they added vanilla to the list, you turned on Phillies baseball on Channel 6, nd you got one chance to check out a player’s batting average. His first at bat.

    That was it. As the game progressed, By, Bill (who celebrated number 90 yesterday for what has to be the 8th time) or Whitey would tell you in sequential innings what the guys did in priorat bats, but you only had vivibility of the average, which you thought was importrant one ttime.

    And the funny thing was that the generation before me probably thought that that one time was a major improvement.

    The next morning, if the game was close enough to the East Coast, you could see what the new average was, 4-5 at bats more than the now prior game, but you couldn’t watch it ebb and flow intra-game.

    Now, even though we’ve hit NFL Week 1 (congrats Andy Reid), the crack staff at ESPN has updated its ERA leaders, and you can keep the former price of the Sunday Inky tomorrow because I’m here to tell you that Hamels is now 23rd in The League in ERA, up from 27 which was part of a message earlier. If we could play until February, maybe he can get up to second. Ain’t nobody catching Homeboy.

     
    • Posts: 0 George

      Back in the day, all the stats had to be figured with pencil and paper, which wasn’t very speedy, especially if done by sports jocks who barely made “Cs” in math. West coast results had to be sent back via teletype after all the calculations were done, and morning newspapers had to go to press around 2:00AM. Thatr was just about the time when west coast games were finishing.

      Now there are computers doing the math, satellite connections to the Pacific Rim, and papers are composed more quickly with “delete” keys instead of proofs.

      I sometimes wonder if it’s all that great of an improvement. I really don’t need to know that Joe Blow has a better or worse BA after the seventh inning or that a pitcher has surpassed some other guy’s ERA when the other guy hasn’t even finished pitching. I also don’t find any improvement in the papers when misuse of the delete key and a lack of proofreading turns a sentence to giberish.

      But, then again, I’ve always been partial to chocolate ice cream. 31 flavors just makes it all very confusing, and my choice becomes too hard to find on the menu.

       
      • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

        Whether we care or not about the immediacy of updated stats, at lest myself, I think it’s great to have the option of their availability. No question, there’s a degree of overkill hiding in there, but to me, the choice is good.

        And the real fun thing about it, again, at least to me, valuing historic presentation of the sport is it’s really cool to look at today’s renaissance portion of my baseball fandom, and compare it to back then when my passion and responsibility levels were fairly similar, despite the huge difference in parts of life’s spectrum. The differences, and similarities are really fun to compare.

        They can’t say I didn’t attend Philosophy 101 class today.

         
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    I’m touched this morning by the relative meaning of numbers. I think back to the many people either mandated to, or naïve enough to do pre-season standing and record predictions of the Phils and other clubs, and while I can’t put names to numbers, there were more than a bunch around the baseball globe that in the Phillies case were somewhere between 81 and 89.

    I’m sure many of those folks knew that a lot of things had to go right to especially hit the upper level of that range, and maybe it was more on the local level where some degree of prejudice and/or optimism had to play a role, but there just weren’t many below 81.Certainly locally, as in those that would qualify as Phillie fans.

    And I recall one guy in particular, and my reaction to it at the time. His name’s Kevin, I don’t remember his last name, though if my life depended on it, Clooney rings a bell, and I believe he is a beat guy for one of the ‘burban papers. I need to remember the word ‘burban, in case I ever do a twit where 140 characters is the salary cap. They usually are.

    Kevin said the Phils’d go 79-83.

    And I remember thinking that if he’s right, it’s gonna be another bummer of a baseball summer, which I wasn’t too anxious to endure consecutively after several seasons in a row almost made me forget the long and often miserable youth I had following this addicted to ball club when there wasn’t laughter to at least get out of said misery. Phizzies, Clay Dalpimple, Gene Mauch treating the clubhouse ceiling to spare ribs, there were a few laughs, and it was net cool despite the emptiness of many summer nights when the L column added a count.

    But now, particularly teased, although a lot of this seems real, by the recent play, you look at 79 SO differently. I mean, it doesn’t matter. No playoffs is no playoffs, but you look at79 so differently.

    Even if it is a consolation, if it’s Kevin’s destiny to nail the number on the head for club wins, you can’t possibly measure the excitement the peeps would have to start next year 4 weeks from today. That’d be 13-6 the rest of the way, stretching Sandberg’s 14-10 recent record. Deceptive and meaningless as it’d be, the emotion meter would head more north than Septa does from Tasker Morris to Fern Rock.

    It’s just strange, but part of the dips and curves of life how such an uninspiring number at one point looks so over the top good now. Maybe if I checked Webster’s under fool’s gold, I’d find this exact story in the definition part of the text, but it’d be interesting to get there, and check out reaction. If it was “I told you so” from Kevin,” it’d be a ridiculous misrepresentation of a largely coincidental guess, but hey, the bottom line is the bottom line. I suppose it’s the same deal as last year, and perhaps more so when 81 looked like an exercise in misery when spring sprung, but by the time the leaves turned, it was pretty inspiring stuff.

    I hope this message doesn’t become an annual occurrence..

     
 
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