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20 Years Ago Today, Carter Broke Our Hearts

Posted by Pat Gallen, Wed, October 23, 2013 10:43 AM | Comments: 3
Analysis, News, Posts

Joe Carter

(astropix.com)

It seems like only yesterday Mitch Williams was flailing at home plate with two runners on in the ninth inning of Game 6 of the 1993 World Series. Alas, it has been 20 years.

Twenty years have passed since Joe Carter deposited one of the most historic, memorable, crushing home runs in baseball history. The walkoff won the Blue Jays the World Series, and broke the hearts of Phillies fans everywhere.

Twenty years have passed since that magical 1993 season ended. Since that time, many of the players on the team have gone on to have varying degrees of success, turmoil, personal tragedy.

Darren Daulton finally won a ring with the Marlins in 1997, but is now dealing with a life-threatening illness. Lenny Dykstra became a money man, then had it all crumble. John Kruk has cemented himself as a solid baseball analyst with ESPN. Curt Schilling became one of the finest postseason pitchers of all time, but recently went bankrupt. Mitch Williams has somehow segued into broadcasting.

Twenty years ago, the Phillies did the unthinkable and got as far as Game 6, only to have it slip away.

What a run. A run we’ll always remember.

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About Pat Gallen

Pat Gallen has written 1714 articles on Phillies Nation.

Pat is Editor-in-Chief of Phillies Nation. He also covers the Phils for 97.5 FM in Philly.

 
 
  • Posts: 0 Ken Bland

    Ya know, no offense, nothing personal, but what kind of editorial decision, what kind of person would acknowledge the “anniversary of this.

    It’s possible it’s just me, I dunno….I can talk about Black Friday, ’64, numerous other just crushing moments since I got hooked on the ballclub, but this particular at bat?

    To each their own.

    I’m not writing this to reflect passion, I’m being deadly serious.

     
  • Posts: 0 wbramh

    Agree, and frankly, I thought that Joe Carter moment was great baseball theater with Mitch Williams attempting to give his “last full measure” and just running out of gas at least one pitch too soon.Speaking as someone who has lived and died with the team for many decades I’ve learned to love the game more than the final score. Those Mets sellouts at the Polo Grounds during their 4 straight last place finishes still speak volumes (to again quote Lincoln) about that “more perfect union” between team and real fans.

    I attended every home game of that series (as well as every home game in the league championship series versus the Braves). I”d have to that the 15-14 loss to the Jays was even more exciting than Schilling’s brilliant 2-0 win the following night.

    When that ball was rocketed into the left field stands there was both an “ouch” and a “wow” mixed in my emotions. My outclassed home team had knocked off the invincible Braves then come back to extend a superb Toronto team letting them know they were in a battle.

    So while this may sound crazy to some, I remember that moment with not-so-strange fondness just as I remember Mitch Williams pitching with his giant heart every time watch him on the MLB Network.

    A broken heart? Not even close.

     
  • Posts: 0 Ryan

    That team is and always will be my favorite group of guys to ever step on a field in Philadelphia.

    At the end of every season that doesn’t end the way I had hoped, I’m always reminded that no matter what happened the year before, if you put the right group of guys together with enough passion, heart, and fight in them, they might surprise you.

    The ’93 Phillies proved this to all of us. They never gave up and kept on fighting till there was nothing left.

    Their motto that year easily could have been the same thing that Dutch is teaching us now… Right on, Fight on.

     
 
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