Quantcast


Archive for January, 2014

The Phillies Nation Top 100: #37 Puddin’ Head Jones

Posted by Ian Riccaboni, Fri, January 31, 2014 12:00 PM Comments: 6

The Phillies Nation Top 100 continues today with #37. Our mission is to assess the Top 100 Phillies players of all time using impact to the Phillies, individual achievement, team achievement, traditional stats, and analytics as our criteria. The list was compiled by Ian Riccaboni and Pat Gallen with input from the rest of the Phillies Nation staff. 

From this point forward, each weekday, we will reveal two Phillies from the PN Top 100 in separate posts. To view the 2008 iteration of the list of Greatest Phillies of All Time as compiled by Tim Malcolm, please click here.

Please check back Monday morning for #36.

http://image2.findagrave.com/photos250/photos/2012/84/3111_133268939372.jpg#37 – Willie “Puddin’ Head” Jones

Years: 1947-1959

.258/.343/.413, 180 HR, 39 SB in 6241 PA

Previous Rank: 65 (+28)

fWAR Phillies Rank: 26th among position players, 35th among Phillies

Signature Achievements: Played 34th most games at third base in Major League history, ranks tenth in putouts among third baseman, was top five in range factor from 1950 through 1959, and led the league in fielding percentage six times as a Phillie

Made Two Consecutive All-Star Teams (1950-1951)

Continue reading The Phillies Nation Top 100: #37 Puddin’ Head Jones

  • 6 Comments
 

The Phillies Nation Top 100: #38 Elmer Flick

Posted by Ian Riccaboni, Fri, January 31, 2014 08:30 AM Comments: 1

The Phillies Nation Top 100 continues today with #38. Our mission is to assess the Top 100 Phillies players of all time using impact to the Phillies, individual achievement, team achievement, traditional stats, and analytics as our criteria. The list was compiled by Ian Riccaboni and Pat Gallen with input from the rest of the Phillies Nation staff. 

From this point forward, each weekday, we will reveal two Phillies from the PN Top 100 in separate posts. To view the 2008 iteration of the list of Greatest Phillies of All Time as compiled by Tim Malcolm, please click here.

Please check back this afternoon for #37.

#38 – Elmer Flick

Years: 1898-1901

.338/.419/.487, 29 HR, 119 SB in 2346 PA

Previous Rank: New to Rankings

fWAR Phillies Rank: 27th among position players, 37th among Phillies

Signature Stat: Fourth in Phillies history in OBP (.419)

Ah, the age-old story of the early Phillies: develop superstar player, get into contract squabble, let player go for nothing, player goes on to be Hall of Famer. As if the Phillies didn’t learn in 1901 with Nap Lajoie, the Phillies would play hardball with Flick and Ed Delahanty after the 1901 season and lose both future Hall of Famers as well. My my, what could have been? Continue reading The Phillies Nation Top 100: #38 Elmer Flick

  • 1 Comments
 

The Phillies Nation Top 100: #39 Larry Christenson

Posted by Ian Riccaboni, Thu, January 30, 2014 05:00 PM Comments: 3

The Phillies Nation Top 100 continues today with #39. Our mission is to assess the Top 100 Phillies players of all time using impact to the Phillies, individual achievement, team achievement, traditional stats, and analytics as our criteria. The list was compiled by Ian Riccaboni and Pat Gallen with input from the rest of the Phillies Nation staff. 

From this point forward, each weekday, we will reveal two Phillies from the PN Top 100 in separate posts. To view the 2008 iteration of the list of Greatest Phillies of All Time as compiled by Tim Malcolm, please click here.

Please check back tomorrow morning for #38.

#39 – Larry Christenson

Years: 1973-1983

83-71, 3.79 ERA, 1.280 WHIP in 1402.2 IP

Previous Rank: 53 (+14)

fWAR Phillies Rank: 10th among pitchers, 36th among Phillies

Signature Season: Went 13-14 with a 3.24 ERA, 1.123 WHIP in 1979

Oddball Fact: Was the only Phillies’ starting pitcher to have the privilege of wearing the Saturday Night Special, all-red uniform on May 19, 1979

From the mid-1970′s through the early 80′s, the Phillies could count on a few things: Mike Schmidt was going to hit between 35 and 40 homers, play great defense, and be in the MVP race, Steve Carlton was going to strikeout between 200 and 250 batters and be in the Cy Young race, Larry Bowa and Garry Maddox were going to be play Gold Glove defense, and Larry Christenson was going average 25 starts a year with a mid 3′s ERA and a low 1.2s WHIP. Continue reading The Phillies Nation Top 100: #39 Larry Christenson

  • 3 Comments
 

The Phillies Nation Top 100: #40 Rick Wise

Posted by Ian Riccaboni, Thu, January 30, 2014 11:00 AM Comments: 7

The Phillies Nation Top 100 continues today with #40. Our mission is to assess the Top 100 Phillies players of all time using impact to the Phillies, individual achievement, team achievement, traditional stats, and analytics as our criteria. The list was compiled by Ian Riccaboni and Pat Gallen with input from the rest of the Phillies Nation staff. 

From this point forward, each weekday, we will reveal two Phillies from the PN Top 100 in separate posts. To view the 2008 iteration of the list of Greatest Phillies of All Time as compiled by Tim Malcolm, please click here.

Please check back this afternoon for #39.

#40 – Rick Wise

Years: 1964, 1966-1971

75-76, 3.60 ERA, 1.302 WHIP in 1244.2 IP

Previous Rank: 82 (+42)

fWAR Phillies Rank: 11th among pitchers, 38th among Phillies

Signature Game: Threw a no-hitter and hit two home runs against the Cincinnati Reds on June 23, 1971

Wise is frequently remembered most as the answer to the following trivia question: what Phillies pitcher was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals for Steve Carlton? But Wise was much more than that; for parts of seven seasons, Wise was an All-Star caliber pitcher stuck on a franchise headed in a downward spiral. Wise would be dealt before the team hit rock bottom in 1972 but was far and away the staff leader from 1966 through 1971.

Wise was among the most durable starters in the pitching-heavy National League during his stay in Philly, pitching 180 innings or more in five straight seasons, pitching the sixteenth-most innings in the National League from 1966 through 1971, winning the seventeenth-most decisions, and posting an ERA on the positive side of the league average three times. Wise’s 52 complete games from 1966 through 1971 ranked 13th in the National League while his 13 shutouts in that period tied him for 16th. Continue reading The Phillies Nation Top 100: #40 Rick Wise

  • 7 Comments
 

Quinn progressing well from Achilles surgery

Posted by Jonathan Nisula, Thu, January 30, 2014 07:30 AM Comments: 1

RomanQuinn3

Roman Quinn, Image- Jay Floyd

This week, PhilliesNation’s own minor league expert Jay Floyd chatted with highly regarded shortstop prospect Roman Quinn about his recovery from off-season surgery, exclusively for ShoreSportsNetwork.com.

In the feature, the 20-year-old indicated that he’s well ahead of schedule as he recovers from the procedure to remedy his ruptured right Achilles tendon.  Quinn was doing routine sprints in October near his home in Florida, when he felt a pop in the back of his ankle.  Surgery came soon after for the Phils’ 2nd round draft choice from 2011.

Quinn, who posted a .238 average with five home runs, 21 RBI and 32 steals in 67 games for Class A Lakewood last year, is targeting a late-June or early-July return.

The youngster was still recovering from a broken left wrist that he suffered after being hit by a pitch in a game in June, at the time of the Achillies injury, but that first ailment is now 100%.

In the Floyd piece, Quinn details that he was very disappointed when he learned the diagnosis of his Achilles issue, but that a discussion with a friend in the Phils’ system provided him the boost that he needed to turn his outlook around.

“It brought me down real low, man,” Quinn explained. “It was just very discouraging until I talked with Albert Cartwright, actually. He had the same injury. I talked to him about his injury and everything and he was just telling me, ‘Stay with it and just go hard in your rehab, man, and you can come back even faster, even stronger.’ ‘Cause that’s exactly what he did and as soon as I heard that, it gave me all my confidence back.”

Continue reading Quinn progressing well from Achilles surgery

  • 1 Comments
 

O’Hare Suspended for Violating Drug Policy

Posted by Ian Riccaboni, Wed, January 29, 2014 12:58 PM Comments: 0

According to Matt Gelb, LHP Christopher O’Hare, a 2013 23rd round draft choice out of Boston, MA’s Fisher College, was suspended today for 50 games for violating MiLB’s minor league drug policy. O’Hare, 23, was a senior-sign out of college and pitched five innings in the Phillies system last season across Gulf Cost, Lakewood, and Clearwater with a 3.60 ERA.

  • 0 Comments
 

The Phillies Nation Top 100: #41 Tony Gonzalez

Posted by Ian Riccaboni, Wed, January 29, 2014 12:00 PM Comments: 0

The Phillies Nation Top 100 continues today with #41. Our mission is to assess the Top 100 Phillies players of all time using impact to the Phillies, individual achievement, team achievement, traditional stats, and analytics as our criteria. The list was compiled by Ian Riccaboni and Pat Gallen with input from the rest of the Phillies Nation staff. 

From this point forward, each weekday, we will reveal two Phillies from the PN Top 100 in separate posts. To view the 2008 iteration of the list of Greatest Phillies of All Time as compiled by Tim Malcolm, please click here.

Please check back tomorrow morning for #40.

http://www.ootpdevelopments.com/board/attachments/ootp-mods-rosters-photos-quick-starts/210682d1299762280-gambo-t_wil1-photopack-phi001gonzalez.jpg#41 – Tony Gonzalez

Years: 1960-1968

.295/.359/.433, 77 HR, 68 SB in 4194 PA

Previous Rank: 51 (+10)

fWAR Phillies Rank: 28th among position players, 39th among Phillies

Signature Season: Hit .302/.371/.494 with 20 HR and 17 SB in 1962

The versatile, left-handed hitting outfielder Gonzalez was acquired by the Phillies on June 15, 1960 in a trade that sent  right fielder Wally Post back to Cincinnati with starting left fielder, West Chester alum Harry “The Horse” Anderson. At the time, it was a bit of a gamble: the Phillies had finished 64-90 the previous season and seemingly weren’t on track to get much better in 1960, while Post and Anderson had combined for 34 HR the previous season. The Phillies, however, still had a giant hole in center field after trading Richie Ashburn in January for a package that included Al Dark and John Buzhardt. After a 14-2 loss to Sandy Koufax and the Los Angeles Dodgers,  the 1960 Phillies, at 20-34, pulled the trigger and acquired the 23-year old center fielder from the Reds.

In his second full season with the club, Gonzalez would explode with a career-best 20 HR and 17 SBs and a career-high slugging percentage. He would top his batting average and OBP of 1962 in 1963, hitting .306/.372/.436 with just four homers and 17 steals and finish 23rd in the MVP voting. Gonzalez would be one of the many Phillies to disappear, however, in September 1964, hitting an uncharacteristically-low .225/.253/.300. Aside from that minor blip, Gonzalez was one of the primary offensive leaders on a set of clubs that would exceed expectations throughout the mid-60s but ultimately fall short of reaching a pennant.

Gonzalez ranks fifth among Phillies center fielders in homers, tenth in runs, fifth in RBIs,  eighth in batting average and OBP, and ninth in slugging. Among contemporary center fielders, from 1960 through 1967, Gonzalez ranked seventh in the MLB in batting average, eighth in OBP, and eleventh in slugging. When those lists are filtered for just National League players, it shortens to include only names like Willie Mays, Richie Ashburn, and Vada Pinson in front of Gonzalez. Not bad company.

  • 0 Comments
 

Giants’ Flannery Raises Money for Beating Victim

Posted by Pat Gallen, Wed, January 29, 2014 08:12 AM Comments: 3

This has nothing to do with the Philadelphia Phillies, but I don’t care. Once in a while, it’s good to shine a light on the positive instead of the negative, which has happened far too often this offseason due to the Phillies moves – or lackthereof.

Out in San Francisco, Giants coach Tim Flannery is helping out Bryan Stow, a man who was beaten to within an inch of his life outside of Dodger Stadium on opening day 2011. As Stow’s medical bills have piled up, Flannery decided to get his band involved – he’s an accomplished musician – to raise money for the Stow family. After a series of shows in California, Flannery’s band sent $96,000 to the Stow’s.

“That was, for me, kind of a gamble,” Flannery said by phone Monday. “People always say, ‘Well, why don’t you just write a check?’ I always say, ‘Well, I only hit nine home runs in my 10-year career, I can’t just write a big check.’

“I did write a check. I wrote a check that produced a new record. … I’m just playing the music. I’m doing the same thing I always do. For people to come and just continue the love, it’s a great, great honor.”

Give it up for Flannery and his mates.

 

  • 3 Comments
 

The Phillies Nation Top 100: #42 Jimmy Ring

Posted by Ian Riccaboni, Wed, January 29, 2014 08:00 AM Comments: 1

The Phillies Nation Top 100 continues today with #42. Our mission is to assess the Top 100 Phillies players of all time using impact to the Phillies, individual achievement, team achievement, traditional stats, and analytics as our criteria. The list was compiled by Ian Riccaboni and Pat Gallen with input from the rest of the Phillies Nation staff. 

From this point forward, each weekday, we will reveal two Phillies from the PN Top 100 in separate posts. To view the 2008 iteration of the list of Greatest Phillies of All Time as compiled by Tim Malcolm, please click here.

Please check back this afternoon for #41.

http://www.sullivanet.com/phillieshof/ring.jpg#42 – Jimmy Ring

Years: 1921-1925, 1928

68-98, 4.47 ERA, 1.576 WHIP in 1461 IP

Previous Rank: 72 (+30)

fWAR Phillies Rank: 12th among pitchers, 40th among Phillies

Signature Stat: Led the Phillies in the following categories in the 1920s: wins, games, games started, Ks, K/9 IP, and innings pitched

In the 1920s, there was exactly one highlight on the Phillies rather putrid pitching staffs and his name was Jimmy Ring. Through the 1920s, the Phillies went a combined 566-962 (37.04%), winning 62 games or less eight times in ten seasons, including just 50 games in 1923. Ring was acquired on November 22, 1920 for pitcher Eppa Rixey, a name you will see later in this countdown. Ring was the best player on a set of incredibly bad teams while Rixey would go on to have a Hall of Fame career. You win some trades, you lose some: the Phillies of the 1920s lost just about all of them.

Ring would be Steve Carlton in 1972 before Steve Carlton in 1972 happened: in 1923, despite his team posting a .325 winning percentage, Ring won 18 games, earning 6.0 fWAR for the season, fifth in baseball, with the eighth most innings pitched. Despite a 3.87 ERA, he was borderline dominant with the 19th highest K/9 IP in baseball. In his first stint with the Phillies, Ring was frequently above-average in terms of ERA, with the NL league average fluctuating between 3.78 and 4.26 and well above-average in K/9 IP.

Of any of the players in the Top 100, Ring likely had the most working against him during his stay on the Phillies. From 1921 through 1925, the Phillies were, by almost literally every measure, including Total Zone rating (16th out of 16 MLB teams) and fielding percentage (14th out of 16 MLB teams), the worst fielding team in all of baseball. Ring pitched in front of a team that not only could not physically get to balls but a team that, when they would get to a ball, was highly likely to commit an error on it. Combine that with the ridiculously short right-field porch at the Baker Bowl and it was a recipe for disaster for any pitcher.

Yet, some how, some way, Ring surpassed all expectations, his 64-81 (44.14%) mark from 1921 through 1925 seemingly horrible but yet still outpacing by a decent margin the success of his team (36.71%). In decisions that Ring was not involved in, the Phillies fell to a remarkably horrible 217-403. Ring was the poor-man’s 1972 Steve Carlton and quite literally the only bright spot on a set of teams that were among the worst in baseball for the entire decade when offense was exploding in an offense-friendly ballpark.

  • 1 Comments
 

Law Ranks Phillies Farm System Favorably

Posted by Pat Gallen, Tue, January 28, 2014 08:50 PM Comments: 11

How’s this for a bit of a turnaround. After several years of below average grades, Keith Law has the Phillies farm system ranked 14th in the majors.

Here’s what Law said:

Similar to Texas but with fewer prospects who are potential grade 65 or better players in the majors. I thought the Phillies had one of the best drafts, perhaps the best of anyone, in 2013, landing a few high-ceiling high school kids — such as shortstop J.P. Crawford — while mixing in some solid college bats like catcher Andrew Knapp.

You know the names well: Franco, Biddle, Quinn, Tocci, etc. Finally, one of the foremost experts on the minor leagues has given some praise to a system that hasn’t had much going right for it lately. After unloading many of their best names in the Cliff Lee, Hunter Pence, and Roy Oswalt deals, among others, the depleted farm could finally be on it’s way back to prominence.

On Wednesday, Law will release his Top 100 prospects list throughout baseball.

Currently, our own Jay Floyd is bringing the heat as he unveils the Phillies organizational rankings. You should be checking that out!

Phillies tickets

  • 11 Comments
 
Previous Page