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The Phillies Nation Top 100: #35 Shane Victorino

Posted by Ian Riccaboni, Mon, February 03, 2014 12:00 PM | Comments: 11
Features, History, Phillies Nation Top 100 - 2014

The Phillies Nation Top 100 continues today with #35. Our mission is to assess the Top 100 Phillies players of all time using impact to the Phillies, individual achievement, team achievement, traditional stats, and analytics as our criteria. The list was compiled by Ian Riccaboni and Pat Gallen with input from the rest of the Phillies Nation staff. 

From this point forward, each weekday, we will reveal two Phillies from the PN Top 100 in separate posts. To view the 2008 iteration of the list of Greatest Phillies of All Time as compiled by Tim Malcolm, please click here.

Please check back tomorrow morning for #34.

#35 – Shane Victorino

Years: 2005-2012

.279/.345/.439, 88 HR, 179 SB in 3977 PA

Previous Rank: New to Rankings

fWAR Phillies Rank: 25th among position players, 33rd among Phillies

Signature Moment: Grand Slam in Game 2 of the 2008 NLDS off of C.C. Sabathia

Three straight Gold Gloves (2008-2010), Two All-Star appearances (2009, 2011)

The Flyin’ Hawaiian came to the Phillies prior to the 2005 season as part of the Rule 5 draft. Selected from the Dodgers by General Manager Ed Wade, Victorino would not make the Phillies out of camp and would be offered back to Los Angeles. The Dodgers would decline the return of Victorino and the rest is history: Victorino would win International League MVP honors after a birth in the International League All-Star game, being named Phillies minor league player of the year. By September 2005, he would reach the Majors and stay there for good.

Victorino quickly became a fan favorite for his excellent outfield defense and his tantalizing speed. In 2006, the switch-hitting outfielder would see time across all three outfield positions and move to right field for 2007. In 2008, Victorino would cross the 600 PA threshold for the first time in his career, starting 134 games in center field. Victorino would have a breakout campaign, turning heads with not only his speed but his emerging power: the 5’9″ speedster would hit 30 2B, 8 3B, and 14 HR with a .292/.352/.447 line while also winning his first Gold Glove.

Victorino would cement his place in Phillies history in the 2008 postseason, hitting two very memorable homers. The first was a bases-loaded, two-out shot in the second inning of Game 2 of the NLDS off of C.C. Sabathia to give the Phillies a 5-2 that they wouldn’t relinquish. The second, a two-run, one-out shot off of Cory Wade of the Dodgers in the Top of the 8th to knot Game 4 of the NLCS up at 5, setting the stage for Matt Stairs‘ moonshot three batters later.

Victorino would win three-straight Gold Gloves from 2008 through 2010, earn All-Star appearances in 2009 and 2011, win the Lou Gehrig Memorial Award in 2008, and the Branch Rickey Award in 2011. For his career, Victorino has an 82.84% stolen base success rate, the 23rd best percentage all-time, ranks second in baseball history in fielding percentage for a center fielder, and fifth in baseball history in fielding percentage among outfielders. Victorino would rank sixth among center fielders in steals from 2005 through 2012, seventh in runs, and 18th in OPS. Among Phillies to primarily play center field, Victorino ranks third in homers, sixth in runs and RBIs, seventh in steals, and tenth in OPS.

On July 31, 2012, Victorino’s tenure with the Phillies would come to an end, being dealt to the Los Angeles Dodgers for pitchers Ethan Martin and Josh Lindblom only a few hours before the trade deadline. After the 2012 season, Victorino would sign with the Boston Red Sox, winning a Gold Glove for his work in right field and earning another World Series ring.

 

Avatar of Ian Riccaboni

About Ian Riccaboni

Ian Riccaboni has written 821 articles on Phillies Nation.

Ian's athletic achievements include getting stuffed by NBA center Aaron Gray in high school and hitting .179 over four years for NYU against D-III, NAIA, JuCo, and NCBA schools. Ian hopes his athletic successes will help him achieve his dream of becoming the underground Bob Uecker.

 
 
  • Posts: 0 Vinnie

    I wish he was still here.

     
  • Posts: 0 Bart Shart

    The guy is a winner and I also wish he were still here

     
  • Posts: 0 mudmin

    Agreed. Shane may have taken some ridiculous routes and had the occasional bone-headed move, but the guy knew how to win and seemed to come up clutch. I even wonder how much better he could have been had Cholly not been so determined to let Rollins bat leadoff.

    I’d much rather give him the 13 mil we’re giving Paps. Think Boston would trade?

     
    • Posts: 0 schmenkman

      Agree with all that, except that Vic has 1000 PAs in the leadoff spot and did quite a bit worse than his overall stats.

       
    • Posts: 2993 Chuck A.

      Avatar of Chuck A.

      Yeah…in hindsight it was a mistake. Pence would have been too expensive to keep and eventually sign. But Vic could have slid nicely over to right and we still could have had made that deal for Revere. And he wouldn’t have been overly expensive, either. At least no more expensive than some of Ruben’s other moves that maybe leave something to be desired.

      Glad he won that second ring last year. I was rooting for him and the Sox.

       
  • Posts: 0 bacardipr

    This is the one thing i never understood most of the imbeciles on various blogs absolutely hated Shane. Yes i know every once in a while he had a bonehead moment. These where few and far. Overall he did a lot for this team and had the most fire and intensity. That at time would cause a lapse in judgement. By far one of the more popular players outside of the internet and blog realm. Just go to any sports bar during his tenure here.

     
  • Posts: 0 George

    Just ion case anyone hadsn’t noticed, the Sox are paying Victorino a total of $39M. Had Amaor forked out that much for three more years of Vic, I doubt if anyone would have been so happy about it. After all, there are enormous numbers of people who whine about the Phils’ ancient lineup.

    I liked Vic while he was here, but I also think the front office may have averted another anvil-like contract by not keeping him around for three more years. He was good for Boston in 2013, but that doesn’t mean he’ll still be good in ’14 and ’15. Time will tell, perhaps, whether the Phils made the right move by trading him for Ethan Martin, a much younger and cheaper player.

    I think it may prove best that he’s gone while people think so highly of him, rather than after he’s had a couple of bad seasons. Look at Rollins, a once popular player who is now barely tolerated on this site.

     
  • Posts: 0 mudmin

    I think 3/39 was a reasonable contract. It’s not like he got Jayson Werth money.

     
  • Posts: 0 bacardipr

    While i understand the Rollins comparison you make. Some of the stat guys like Schmek will probably argue that. Shane is 3 years younger than Marlon Byrd. I wouldnt say the contract handed out to him was a Anvil of a contract. I also think it was a reasonable contract as well. Perhaps a very slight overpay. While i can’t predict Ehtan’s future so far he is shaping up to be a mid-reliever with spotty control type.

     
  • Posts: 0 brooks

    My most memorable Shane moment was the ‘Flyin Hawaiin bobble head game. Played in the rain Phils behind most of the game until Howard tied it up with a late inning 3 run homer. Bottom of the 9th, Shane got his only hit of the night – a game winning solo shot. Well played Shane! Great game..

     
  • Avatar of The Original Chuck P

    We just gave Marlon Byrd $8 million per year for two years (three if he hits a vesting option)… I was probably the first guy saying that Shane needed to go… that his skills were replaceable and I generally feel that they are (I think Revere will be fine) but if I had known that we weren’t going to sign a legitimate major league caliber right fielder, I would have rather seen us give Shane $13 per for 3.

    There were times when Shane drove me nuts but I always loved his passion. We all loved his grit and the way he lightened the clubhouse without crossing lines. He was very genuine… and I think that’s a defining characteristic of most of our guys. Our whole team was genuine. You knew what you were getting with Werth (aloof, stoic), Utley (all business), Rollins (talented and cocky) and Vic (light-hearted and passionate) whether you liked it or not. With Pap-el-turd, you don’t know if you’re getting – ocho cinco, the goofball or the emotional train wreck that throws his team under the bus. I don’t know… we all miss Shane.

     
 
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