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Asche hits DL, De Fratus Returns

Posted by Pat Gallen, Sun, May 25, 2014 12:57 PM | Comments: 13
Analysis, News, Opinion, Posts

Bad news for the Phillies as 3B Cody Asche has hit the DL with a left hammy strain. Justin De Fratus takes his spot on the Phillies roster.

Asche has had a bright May, hitting .317 with 5 doubles and 3 homers. His defense has been suspect, but he’s definitely picked it up with the bat. Cesar Hernandez and Reid Brignac look to pick up the slack with Asche down. Doesn’t look like Maikel Franco is an option…yet.

The 21-year-old has been out of Lehigh Valley’s lineup for two days, described as “under the weather”.

For the IronPigs, De Fratus sported a 4.50 ERA with three saves in 15 games. The 26-year-old notched 13 strike outs while walking four batters over 16 innings during his stint with Lehigh Valley.

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About Pat Gallen

Pat Gallen has written 1684 articles on Phillies Nation.

Pat is Editor-in-Chief of Phillies Nation. He also covers the Phils for 97.5 FM in Philly.

 
 
  • Posts: 0 Hogey's Role

    Tough news to take, maybe Hernandez can pick up offensively with some regular playing time I hope….

    I would love to see Franco come up, a lot of people will say it’s to early, but I like to see what people are really made out of…

     
  • Posts: 0 bacardipr

    I still think its too early for Franco barring some Major injury to Asche. Though i do like the idea of a Sept call up. Since they released Nix I wonder who is next on depth chart after Brignac.

     
    • Posts: 0 wbramh

      “Since they released Nix I wonder who is next on depth chart after Brignac.”

      I’m guessing the equipment manager.

       
      • Posts: 0 c. schreiber

        Mini-Mart

         
  • Posts: 541 Bruce

    Avatar of Bruce

    These injuries (Asche and Cliff Lee) and consequently the DL are so disheartening for the team and fans.

    Today we saw the Phillies played so poorly and sloppy on the field to go along with their feeble hitting. Actually, no hitting against Beckett. Even though the Phillies are the victims, it was exciting in the 9th inning to witness the eventual no-hitter. I have not seen one since Halliday pitched a gem in the playoffs for the Phillies. it was nice too to see the phillies fans give Beckett a standing ovation as he left the field. He deserves all the credit. Beckett was masterful with a commanding fastball and deceptive curve. He hardly worked up a sweat as the Phillies didn’t come close to getting a hit.

    It’s amazing that the Phillies have been shutout SIX of the SEVEN times this season in their cozy CBP home.

    We need to see manager Sandberg start using Ruff in a platoon with a .202 “hitter” named Dominic Brown. You can’t convince me that Brown is a better fielder after seeing him giving a lackadaisical throw back to the infield after a base hit by Puig and allow him to scamper easily to 2nd base in the 7th. inning. I hope Sandberg gave Brown a tongue lash in the dressing room after the game.

     
    • Posts: 0 schmenkman

      ‘It’s amazing that the Phillies have been shutout SIX of the SEVEN times this season in their cozy CBP home.”

      CBP is not a great hitter’s park. It’s one of the most neutral parks in baseball.

      The fact that it’s 6 out of 7, instead of 3 or 4, is well within the vagaries of chance over such a small sample.

       
      • Posts: 0 wbramh

        Chance could shut them out, too… and he’s 72-years-old.
        Dean that is. Frank is 138.

        Dimensionally, CBP is not cozy but any home park should feel cozy to the home team. In other words, they should be playing at their best here. I’m more concerned that the real vagary of chance may be the fact that they haven’t been the victim of another 8 or 9 shutouts on the road.

         
      • Posts: 0 schmenkman

        Since 2005, the Phillies have had the SMALLEST home field advantage in all of baseball (i.e. the relationship between their home recrod and away record).

         
      • Posts: 0 wbramh

        “Since 2005, the Phillies have had the SMALLEST home field advantage…”

        Very true. Even in their 102 win 2011 season they only won 2 more games at home than they won on the road. In their pennant-winning season of 2009 they were actually a better road team – 48 wins on the road to 45 wins at home.

        A team of natural born barnstormers, I’m guessing.
        Or maybe hotel water works like a PED on them.
        Or maybe it’s those blue seats I keep harping about.

         
      • Posts: 0 schmenkman

        Very few blue seats for most of that period.

         
      • Posts: 0 wbramh

        Nobody even knew they were blue seats until this season.

         
    • Posts: 0 wbramh

      Lackadaisical is the word for much of their play of late and I mistakenly thought that condition had been cured by Sandberg.

      In a recent game we saw the same slumping Dom Brown take the ever popular casual trot to 1st on an infield grounder only to be thrown out even after the ball was initially booted by the fielder. Incredulously, on the very next play, Ben Revere took the same slow boat to 1st on his ground ball Only by good fortune, the 1st baseman momentarily dropped the ball along the baseline just as Revere was approaching him and Revere was fortunately able to avoid the tag. You would think seeing a teammate thrown out because he didn’t hustle (and in a game when they desperately needed base runners) would have been a cue to the next batter not to make make the same bonehead mistake. Ironically, the timing of the misplay may have worked out to Revere’s advantage but it still irked me.

      And please – nobody tell me about the low statistical chances of making it safely to first on a “routine” grounder unless you can prove there is zero statistical chance of a hustling runner forcing a bad throw… or beating out a momentarily bobbled ball by the fielder or first baseman.

      You’d think that the guys with the lowest OBPs would be running the fastest to first – or that the same struggling players in the outfield would be concentrating too hard on their job to allow a single to turn into a double. You’d think a team with a growing propensity to be shut out would not that lack of hustle (bordering on indifference). The loyal and paying fans sure don’t like it.

      I would hope Dom Brown was embarrassed by the hustling Puig and learned something from his lack of concentration in the field. If not, then the team has a much bigger problem.

       
      • Posts: 5223 Lefty

        Avatar of Lefty

        To paraphrase our beloved former playoff hero, the mumble-mouthed Mr. Stairs- I agree with you on this 300%(???). I don’t go against the metrics guys very often, but on this I’m definitely with you. (I think 100% would characterize my opinion a little better)

        In addition to the negative effects of not hustling, there is no measurement that can tell you how much one great hustle play might affect the psyche of the whole team POSITIVELY.

        While I agree with the numbers folks that players try their hardest most of the time, they are human beings, and can get down on themselves when they are having a bad day, or the team seems hopelessly down on the scoreboard. By the same token they can get a big lift from a great hustle play by a team mate and it might spark something in themselves to do the same. They might even be spurred on to play to 300% of their ability :-)

         
 
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