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Prospect Rankings No. 10: Mike Stutes

Posted by Ben Seal, Mon, September 14, 2009 06:54 PM Comments: 0

Mike Stutes, RHP

Born:  9/4/1986 in Corvallis, Oregon

Height: 6’1”

Weight: 185

Experience always counts for something, and in the case of Mike Stutes it counts for a lot. The 23-year-old just completed his first full season of sp.beavers.sn.8020minor league ball, but is well ahead of the learning curve for his relative youth as a professional. Before the Phillies chose him in the 11th round (346th overall) of the 2008 Draft, Stutes pitched in college at Oregon State where he helped his team to two straight College World Series in ’06 and ’07. That experience pitching on a big stage for two years in a row will surely make a difference for Stutes in his pro career.

But more important than Stutes’ experience is what he can do on the mound. And pitching all of 2009 at double-A Reading, Stutes showed that he is more than capable on the mound. After throwing 69.2 stellar innings last season between Williamsport and Lakewood, the Phillies decided to move Stutes up to double-A to start 2009, a big jump for his first full pro season. With teammate Vance Worley, Stutes became the first Phillies prospect to start at Reading the year after he was drafted since Pat Burrell in 1999. Stutes handled the task well, finishing the year with a 4.26 ERA in 27 starts. He had some poor stretches, especially as he wore down a bit toward the end of the summer, but also showed a great deal of ability and performed very well most of the time.

Stutes is an athletic pitcher with a good low-90s fastball that still has room to improve if he can add a little bit of size. Both his fastball and his curveball are plus pitches that will carry him as he moves through the system and scouts have described him as having advanced off-speed stuff. He is not a dominant strikeout pitcher, and his strikeouts-to-walk ratio is just about 2-to-1, but that hasn’t stopped him from getting batters out consistently.

His great showing in 2008 across two levels made Stutes look like a fast-track type of pitcher, one that would blaze through the system and make it to the Majors sooner rather than later. This year he made a huge jump to face much more talented batters and fared well, but the real test will come next year. It’s likely that he starts at Reading again and is up with Lehigh Valley in triple-A before long. He has said that he thinks he’s ready to start at triple-A, and that remains a possibility. Either way he will need to find more consistency and continue to grow as a pitcher, which seems attainable for someone with Stutes’ pedigree.

Statistics

Year   Level   W   L   ERA   IP     H    ER    BB    K    K/9

2008   A-      2   1   1.33   27    16    4    11   31   10.3

2008   A       5   1   1.48  42.2   20    7    18   53   11.2

2009   AA      8   8   4.26 145.2  147  69   58   109   6.7

RankingsAll previous prospect profiles can be found here, which is also on the left sidebar for easy viewing

10.  Mike Stutes, RHP
11.  Antonio Bastardo, LHP
12.  Anthony Gose, OF
13.  Colby Shreve, RHP
14.  Anthony Hewitt, 3B
15.  Justin De Fratus, RHP
16.  Sergio Escalona, LHP
17.  Yohan Flande, LHP
18.  Julian Sampson, RHP
19.  John Mayberry, Jr., OF
20.  Mike Cisco, RHP
21.  Freddy Galvis, SS
22.  Jonathan Pettibone, RHP
23.  Domingo Santana, OF
24.  Jonathan Singleton, 1B
25.  Drew Naylor, RHP

  • 0 Comments
 

Prospect Rankings No. 11: Antonio Bastardo

Posted by Ben Seal, Fri, September 11, 2009 01:00 PM Comments: 0

Orioles Phillies BaseballAntonio Bastardo, LHP

Born: 9/21/1985 in Hato Mayor, Dominican Republic

Height: 5’11”

Weight: 195

He only had five starts in the majors, and finished with an ugly ERA, but in that June stretch when he filled in for an injured Brett Myers, Dominican hurler Antonio Bastardo made an impact. He burst onto the scene, a surprise call-up who skipped over some more proven Phillies farmhands, limiting the Padres to one run over 6 innings in his debut. Instantly all the hype that had built over the past two seasons – that he was actually a better prospect than Carlos Carrasco, that he was killer against lefties – was kicked up a notch. And though, by the end of June, it became clear that Bastardo was not quite ready to pitch consistently in the major leagues, it was also clear that he has a future doing just that.

Signed by the Phillies as a non-drafted free agent in 2005, Bastardo got to work in 2006 in the Gulf Coast League. Three years later he has pitched at 6 different levels of the Phillies system, bounced up and down because of a series of successes and setbacks – mostly related to a recurring shoulder injury. Along the way he has posted impressive numbers and earned rave reviews from scouts for a good combination of quality pitches and deception. Without an overpowering fastball he has still managed to strike out more than a batter per inning over his career. His ERA over four seasons (2.58) is excellent, as is his hits per 9 innings (6.7), both showing that despite some bumps along the way he has been very effective.

Bastardo does his best work not based on a blazing fastball or nasty slider, but – much like J.A. Happ – with a very deceptive delivery that makes his fastball seem faster and his changeup drop off the table even quicker. Scouts have pinned his velocity around 90-91 mph on the fastball, though when he was up with the Phillies he clocked 94-95 a handful of times and bottomed out around 90. His changeup is a plus pitch, and a lefty with a great changeup and a low-90s fastball is a dangerous weapon. Bastardo mainly works with those two pitches, though he has a slider that needs work to become a reliable pitch.

The taste of the majors that Bastardo earned this summer will lead to better things down the road, whether in the rotation or the bullpen. Lefties can’t help but flail at his stuff, as they were just 7-for-38 against him this year with 16 strikeouts, good for a .163 average. The first thing Bastardo needs to do is show that he is over his injury issues and work through the offseason to condition himself better for what is sure to be a long year in 2010. He’ll likely start in Lehigh Valley, having shown that he can dominate double-A, and be just a quick call away from the big club.

Statistics – Because of all the bouncing around, Bastardo’s stat sheet is a long one, so check it out in its entirety here.

RankingsAll previous prospect profiles can be found here, which is also on the left sidebar for easy viewing

11.  Antonio Bastardo, LHP
12.  Anthony Gose, OF
13.  Colby Shreve, RHP
14.  Anthony Hewitt, 3B
15.  Justin De Fratus, RHP
16.  Sergio Escalona, LHP
17.  Yohan Flande, LHP
18.  Julian Sampson, RHP
19.  John Mayberry, Jr., OF
20.  Mike Cisco, RHP
21.  Freddy Galvis, SS
22.  Jonathan Pettibone, RHP
23.  Domingo Santana, OF
24.  Jonathan Singleton, 1B
25.  Drew Naylor, RHP

  • 0 Comments
 

Prospect Rankings No. 12: Anthony Gose

Posted by Ben Seal, Wed, September 09, 2009 11:34 AM Comments: 4

goseAnthony Gose, OF

Born: 8/10/1990 in Bellflower, California

Height: 6’1”

Weight: 190

Speed will always be in high demand in the majors, where a stolen base threat on the bags changes the makeup of an inning. And because speed is so valuable on the diamond, Anthony Gose is an exciting member of the Phillies organization. At just 19, and in his first full season in the minor leagues, Gose stole a minor league-leading 76 bases this year with Lakewood. He was named the South Atlantic League’s Most Exciting Prospect in a poll of league managers earlier this season. That type of ability on the basepaths, plus other natural tools, make Gose a prospect to watch.

The Phillies picked Gose in the second round (51st overall) of the 2008 Draft and got a great package in the process. Though the Phillies decided they wanted to use Gose strictly as an outfielder, his left arm is a livewire, as he topped out at 95 mph when pitching from the mound in high school. The tremendous arm translates into the outfield, where Gose is as gifted as they come at making all the necessary throws – he had 13 assists from centerfield this season. Range is also a great asset for Gose, who covers ground smoothly and regularly makes exciting plays in the field. That’s what speed can do for you.

Gose is still a work in progress at the dish. He bats left-handed, like most speedsters, and has a line-drive swing that sprays the ball across the field. After finishing with a .259 average this season it’s clear that Gose has a long way to go before he can become the leadoff-type batter that his tools suggest. He also struck out 110 times against just 35 walks, something that must be corrected for Gose to fit in appropriately atop a lineup. Despite reports when he left high school that there was hidden power in his frame, Gose didn’t flash much this year and looks more like a slap hitter who can pop the occasional round-tripper.

The rare combination of top-notch speed, excellent fielding ability and good tools at the plate make Gose a top prospect. His 76 steals came with 20 times caught stealing this year, but that is still an above-average percentage, especially for a teenager. As he develops as an athlete and a baseball player, Gose should become a smart base-stealer who can swipe a bag in any necessary situation, but never run the team out of an inning. If he can take advantage of all his tools he will be the Phillies centerfielder of the future.

Statistics

Year   Level   AB   H    HR   RBI   BB   K   SB   AVG   OBP   SLG

2008   ROOK   39   10   0     3     1   12   3   .256   .293   .359

2009   A      510   132   2   52   35   110  76  .259   .323   .353

RankingsAll previous prospect profiles can be found here, which is also on the left sidebar for easy viewing

12.  Anthony Gose, OF
13.  Colby Shreve, RHP
14.  Anthony Hewitt, 3B
15.  Justin De Fratus, RHP
16.  Sergio Escalona, LHP
17.  Yohan Flande, LHP
18.  Julian Sampson, RHP
19.  John Mayberry, Jr., OF
20.  Mike Cisco, RHP
21.  Freddy Galvis, SS
22.  Jonathan Pettibone, RHP
23.  Domingo Santana, OF
24.  Jonathan Singleton, 1B
25.  Drew Naylor, RHP

  • 4 Comments
 

Prospect Rankings No. 13: Colby Shreve

Posted by Ben Seal, Fri, September 04, 2009 12:00 PM Comments: 3

shreveColby Shreve, RHP

Born: 1/5/1988 in Las Vegas, NV

Height: 6’5”

Weight: 210

This is easily the most ambitious of all the rankings you will find in our Top 25 Prospects. After undergoing Tommy John surgery in May of 2008, Shreve has still not thrown a professional pitch. But the Phillies are knowledgeable when it comes to bringing pitchers back from the surgery, as Kyle Drabek’s success this season attests. And because Shreve, who was chosen in the 6th round of the 2008 draft, regularly hit 96 mph on the radar gun before his surgery, with two other pitches to complement his fastball, he has the potential to bounce back next year and start off on the fast-track.

Shreve was drafted in the 7th round by the Braves in 2007 but chose not to sign and instead returned for another year of JuCo ball at Southern Nevada. The extra year gave Shreve a chance to really work on his arsenal and he took advantage. He cranked his fastball up from the low-90s to the mid-90s on a regular basis and developed a strong changeup to go with it. He uses his curveball as a spot pitch, much like Cole Hamels, and will need to improve on it to use it in pro ball. Shreve’s long frame allows him to easily throw blazing fastballs, and with an above-average changeup he has two pitches to get batters out with.

Obviously there is not much to go by with Shreve, but the fact that the Phillies drafted him in a high slot despite his surgery coming before the draft says a lot. It was a risky pick, one that the Phillies know will yield a high return if he is capable of maximizing his ability. It won’t be until 2010 that we get a feel for what Shreve can do against professional hitters, but the potential for a great bullpen arm is there, so keep an eye on him.

RankingsAll previous prospect profiles can be found here, which is also on the left sidebar for easy viewing

13.  Colby Shreve, RHP
14.  Anthony Hewitt, 3B
15.  Justin De Fratus, RHP
16.  Sergio Escalona, LHP
17.  Yohan Flande, LHP
18.  Julian Sampson, RHP
19.  John Mayberry, Jr., OF
20.  Mike Cisco, RHP
21.  Freddy Galvis, SS
22.  Jonathan Pettibone, RHP
23.  Domingo Santana, OF
24.  Jonathan Singleton, 1B
25.  Drew Naylor, RHP

  • 3 Comments
 

Prospect Rankings No. 14: Anthony Hewitt

Posted by Ben Seal, Wed, September 02, 2009 02:40 PM Comments: 24

hewitt 1Anthony Hewitt, 3B

Born: 4/27/1989 in Brooklyn, NY

Height: 6’1”

Weight: 190

When the Phillies chose Hewitt in the 1st round (24th overall) of the 2008 Draft, there were two schools of thought on the talented teenager. One said that he was the best athlete in the entire draft, a player that garnered extremely high ratings for raw power, speed and arm strength from scouts. Hewitt could flash any of his great skills at any given time and wow anyone watching. With a few years of work to become a professional hitter, Hewitt could become a star, many said.

But there was that second school of thought, the one that said the Phillies reached to draft a player who would never develop the right approach at the plate. He would have to switch from shortstop to third base because of his poor footwork, and even there he might never become a suitable defender.

Now in his second year of short-season ball, Hewitt has given reason for both sides to still think they will be right in the end. He has shown streaks of his immense talent, and he has also struggled to adjust to third base while failing to find consistency at the plate. Hewitt has made 23 errors at third this season, leaving him with an ugly .837 fielding percentage. At the dish, his .224 average looks bad and his 75 strikeouts against just 9 walks looks worse.

But the positives are still there. In 219 at-bats he has ripped off 18 extra-base hits, including 5 triples and 7 homers. He has also stolen 9 bases in a relatively short period of time with Williamsport. And considering he is still just 20 years old, there is reason to believe that he can correct his deficiencies with some helpful coaching along the way. The question with Hewitt is whether or not he will turn the corner and begin to showcase his natural ability on a consistent basis. That’s something that we may not know for three more years, but the athleticism and raw talent is there, so Hewitt’s ceiling is much higher than many of the organization’s prospects. Hopefully he’ll reach that ceiling some day.

Statistics

Year   Level    AB    H   HR  RBI   BB   K   SB   AVG   OBP   SLG

2008   ROOK   117   23   1   9    7    55   2   .197   .256   .299

2009   A-       219   49   7   29   9   75   9   .224   .259   .393

RankingsAll previous prospect profiles can be found here, which is also on the left sidebar for easy viewing

14.  Anthony Hewitt, 3B
15.  Justin De Fratus, RHP
16.  Sergio Escalona, LHP
17.  Yohan Flande, LHP
18.  Julian Sampson, RHP
19.  John Mayberry, Jr., OF
20.  Mike Cisco, RHP
21.  Freddy Galvis, SS
22.  Jonathan Pettibone, RHP
23.  Domingo Santana, OF
24.  Jonathan Singleton, 1B
25.  Drew Naylor, RHP

  • 24 Comments
 

Phillies September Call-Ups

Posted by Ben Seal, Tue, September 01, 2009 01:44 PM Comments: 16

Today is Sept. 1, which means that rosters expand, usually allowing clubs to call up top prospects for a month-long cup of coffee. For the most part that means stolen base threats like Michael Bourn or Greg Golson get time in the majors for pinch-running situations, but it also allows bullpens to expand and (in the Phillies case) hopefully prevent key members from wearing down before the playoffs.

The Phillies first and only move so far was to recall Jack Taschner from his stay down in Lehigh Valley with the Iron Pigs. The left-handed Taschner had a 5.20 ERA in 21 appearances with the Phils before being sent down in July. He pitched well in triple-A, sporting a 2.08 ERA in 21.2 innings down on the farm. Coupled with Scott Eyre, Taschner gives the Phillies two lefties to use out of the ‘pen for situational pitching, not including Jamie Moyer who will continue to be used in long relief.

Any more call-ups will be updated right here, so stay tuned for more.

  • 16 Comments
 

Prospect Rankings No. 15: Justin De Fratus

Posted by Ben Seal, Fri, August 28, 2009 01:00 PM Comments: 0

Justin De Fratus, RHP

Born: 10/21/1987 in Ventura, California

Height: 6’4”

Weight: 215

The Phillies chose De Fratus in the 11th round of the 2007 Draft out of Ventura College, and in a short time in the organization he has already proven himself to be an intriguing young player. He is not a flashy pitcher, just a very consistent one with all the characteristics of a solid prospect who could make himself into something more. He offers a fastball that sits at 89-93 but has topped out at 95 and shows good downward movement in the strike zone, as well as a slider and a changeup. De Fratus throws across his body to create some deception in his pitches, though it might make it difficult for him to repeat his delivery easily.

At 19 years old he started off in the Gulf Coast League, then moved to Williamsport in 2008 and after finishing with a 3.67 ERA there, he has spent this whole season in Lakewood. After pitching in relief through the first portion of the season, De Fratus transitioned to his natural role as a starter and has had mixed results. His first four starts were choppy as he stretched out, but since then he has become a consistent 6-7 inning pitcher for the Blue Claws.

De Fratus has exceptional control that makes his stuff look even better on the mound. Since adding some sink to his fastball he has become a good groundball pitcher that can rack up the strikeouts. Despite his nearly 2-to-1 groundball ratio, the most impressive statistic in his portfolio is his career 4.52 strikeout-to-walk rate, which is an elite number by any scale. Lefties hit well against De Fratus – a .297 clip this season – compared to righties, who hit just .242 off of him.

De Fratus is at just about the right age for his level, and by next season should be pitching in Clearwater with a promotion to Reading a strong possibility if he proves successful. His peripheral numbers indicate that he has all the tools necessary to continue to grow as a pitcher and become a consistent force in the minors. The flexibility he has shown, pitching well both in the bullpen and as a starter, makes him even more valuable to the organization.

Statistics

Year   Level   W   L   ERA    IP    H    ER    BB    K    K/9

2007   ROOK   2   3   4.30   46    51   22    3    34    6.7

2008   A-       6   5   3.67  83.1  87   34    25   74   8.0

2009   A        5   6   3.36  101.2  103  38   16   91   8.1

RankingsAll previous prospect profiles can be found here, which is also on the left sidebar for easy viewing

15.  Justin De Fratus, RHP
16.  Sergio Escalona, LHP
17.  Yohan Flande, LHP
18.  Julian Sampson, RHP
19.  John Mayberry, Jr., OF
20.  Mike Cisco, RHP
21.  Freddy Galvis, SS
22.  Jonathan Pettibone, RHP
23.  Domingo Santana, OF
24.  Jonathan Singleton, 1B
25.  Drew Naylor, RHP

  • 0 Comments
 

Prospect Rankings No. 16: Sergio Escalona

Posted by Ben Seal, Wed, August 26, 2009 12:15 PM Comments: 5

Phillies Padres BaseballSergio Escalona, LHP

Born: 8/3/1984 in El Tocuyo, Venezuela

Height: 6’0”

Weight: 178

This ranking might be a little high for a 25-year-old reliever, but there are reasons to think Escalona could be more helpful for the Phillies than any of the players below him in the near future. While the ceiling for a starter like Yohan Flande or an outfielder like Domingo Santana is certainly higher than Escalona’s, his ability to fit a key role makes him a valuable asset to the organization. His time in the big leagues earlier this season didn’t last terribly long, but in his brief showcase he displayed the skills necessary to be a situational lefthander out of the bullpen if nothing more. In an age of baseball when J.C. Romero commands $4 million a season, the left-handed reliever is a highly sought after, rarely found ingredient for a championship team.

Escalona was signed as an amateur free agent in 2004, so he has been around the system for a while now. He has developed a good fastball that shows deceptive speed. He is predominantly a fastball pitcher, but has a very good curveball to complement his heat as well as an average changeup that has room to become above-average. When he’s on his game, Escalona is an excellent groundball pitcher (better than 2-per-airout) who also happens to carry a career strikeout rate of 9.1 per 9 innings. Those two features combine to make him a great candidate to pitch in the majors as a situational lefty, finishing off an inning with runners on base when the team needs it most.

Another factor making Escalona an important prospect for the Phillies is his time in the majors this year. It wasn’t a lengthy stint, but he logged 6.1 innings and showed that he’s capable of pitching against major league hitters. Lefthanders were 1-for-7 against him (an admittedly small sample size) and batters were just 1-for-10 with runners on base. He had some difficulty immediately after his demotion back to triple-A and is currently throwing for the R-Phils, but it isn’t out of the question that Escalona is back up with the Phillies in September. By next season, when Scott Eyre is likely to leave as a free agent, Escalona could complement Romero as the second lefty in the bullpen, making him an important farmhand for Phillies fans to track.

Statistics – Escalona’s stat sheet runs long, but you can check out his numbers here.

RankingsAll previous prospect profiles can be found here, which is also on the left sidebar for easy viewing

16.  Sergio Escalona, LHP
17.  Yohan Flande, LHP
18.  Julian Sampson, RHP
19.  John Mayberry, Jr., OF
20.  Mike Cisco, RHP
21.  Freddy Galvis, SS
22.  Jonathan Pettibone, RHP
23.  Domingo Santana, OF
24.  Jonathan Singleton, 1B
25.  Drew Naylor, RHP

  • 5 Comments
 

Prospect Rankings No. 17: Yohan Flande

Posted by Ben Seal, Mon, August 24, 2009 07:30 PM Comments: 4

Yohan Flande, LHP

Born: 1/27/1986 in El Seibo, Dominican Republic

Height: 6’2”

Weight: 170

Six months ago Flande was buried in the Phillies farm system, an afterthought in the minds of most who placed more pedigreed pitchers ahead offlande 1 him in the organizational rankings. But with a breakout performance at Clearwater to start the year, an invitation to the Futures Game and a good stretch at Reading since his promotion, the left-handed Dominican has quickly become one of the Phillies most exciting prospects.

The Phillies signed Flande as an amateur free agent out of the D.R. in 2004, where he stayed and eventually played two seasons with the Dominican Summer League team. He pitched very well in 2006 and 2007 in his homeland before joining the Gulf Coast Phillies last season for 10 impressive appearances with an ERA of 2.19 in 53.1 innings. The big test came this season, as Flande advanced to high-A ball to play with Clearwater, where he dominated opponents for the first half of the season, earning himself a spot on the World Team at the Futures Game where he struck out two batters in a scoreless inning of work. Flande’s dream season took a hit after his call-up to Reading, as he struggled in his first four starts. He has since adjusted, posting a 2.06 ERA over his last six starts.

Flande does not have an overpowering fastball like many top prospects, but instead gets by with good command of all his pitches. He has a very effective changeup that functions as an out pitch, and has learned to pitch inside with his fastball to set up his off-speed pitches for success. He has the type of consistent motion that allows him to easily repeat his success one start after the next.

The only reason to doubt Flande’s ability to continue pitching well is that his track record is fairly short. But all of his underlying numbers indicate that he is doing all the right things on the mound. His groundout-to-airout ratio of 1.66 this season is better than average, as is his .250 batting average against. And for a pitcher without a dominant fastball, a career strikeout rate of 7.4 per 9 innings is also excellent. At 23 Flande may be able to quickly rise through the organization over the next year and make his way to the top of the Phillies prospect rankings. For now, though, we can continue to watch him emerge.

Statistics

Year   Level   W   L   ERA    IP   H    ER   BB   K   K/9

2006   ROOK   6   1   2.08   65   55   15   12   60  8.3

2007   ROOK   3   2   2.36   72.1 61  19   27   62  7.7

2008   ROOK   4   1   2.19   53.1 41  13   11   39  6.6

2009   A+       7   1   2.52   82   72   23   24   67  7.4

2009   AA       3   3   4.00  54   55   24   17   42  7.0

RankingsAll previous prospect profiles can be found here, which is also on the left sidebar for easy viewing

17.  Yohan Flande, LHP
18.  Julian Sampson, RHP
19.  John Mayberry, Jr., OF
20.  Mike Cisco, RHP
21.  Freddy Galvis, SS
22.  Jonathan Pettibone, RHP
23.  Domingo Santana, OF
24.  Jonathan Singleton, 1B
25.  Drew Naylor, RHP

  • 4 Comments
 

Prospect Rankings No. 18: Julian Sampson

Posted by Ben Seal, Fri, August 21, 2009 12:30 PM Comments: 0

sampson 1Julian Sampson, RHP

Born: 1/21/1989 in Sammamish, Washington

Height: 6’5”

Weight: 210

Much of determining where a prospect could end up is based around “projectability.”  Stats can go a long way toward providing a decent understanding of a player’s ceiling, but for many prospects it is more about where they will end up than where they are right now. Julian Sampson is one of those prospects. His output so far over two years in the Phillies organization has been less than stellar, but there is reason to believe that when he maximizes his potential and fills out his physical frame, the long-armed hurler will become a new and improved pitcher.

The Phillies drafted Sampson in the 12th round (383 overall) in the 2007 Draft and worked hard to pry him away from attending the University of Washington. He signed late, just before the deadline, and only got in two innings with the GCL Phils that year before the season ended. Sampson spent all of 2008 with Lakewood and posted respectable numbers, including 11 wins, which led all Phillies minor league pitchers. He moved up to high-A Clearwater to begin this year, but after 13 disappointing starts he was bumped back down to the GCL in late July, where he is still working to correct some things.

Scouts love Sampson’s projectability, their way of saying that he still has plenty of room to develop. Several reports indicate that his fastball, which normally sits around 90-92, can be cranked up to about 95 or so because his smooth delivery gives him the ability to add velocity as he gains size and experience. Coaches helped Sampson turn his curveball into a more effective slider and he has been working to incorporate his straight changeup into his repertoire a little more. With a 20-year-old pitcher trying to fix so many things, it’s clear why he’s struggling so much.

Sampson had good control of his fastball when he began to play in the minors, but his walk rate is too high, especially for an unusually low strikeout rate. He does carry a very impressive groundball-to-flyball ratio of nearly 2-to-1, showing that while he might not produce strikeouts he can still keep batters in the infield. Before Sampson can be bumped up a class, he’ll need to show that he’s capable of figuring things out in the GCL and then consistently pitching well if he returns to Clearwater. But he has plenty of time, and in two years it’s very likely that he will have maximized his physical ability and might develop one of the best fastballs in the system.

Statistics

Year   Level   W   L   ERA    IP    H    ER    BB    K    K/9

2007   ROOK   0   0   0.00   2.0    0    0    0     1    4.5

2008   A       11   4   4.33   135  152  65   52   69   4.6

2009   High-A 1   10  7.91   58    81   51   23   27   4.2

2009   ROOK   0   1   5.31   20.1  26   12    5   12   5.3

RankingsAll previous prospect profiles can be found here, which is also on the left sidebar for easy viewing

18.  Julian Sampson, RHP
19.  John Mayberry, Jr., OF
20.  Mike Cisco, RHP
21.  Freddy Galvis, SS
22.  Jonathan Pettibone, RHP
23.  Domingo Santana, OF
24.  Jonathan Singleton, 1B
25.  Drew Naylor, RHP

  • 0 Comments
 
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