Quantcast


2011 Top 25 Prospects

ProspectNation Top 25 – The List

Posted by Pat Gallen, Thu, February 24, 2011 11:00 PM Comments: 9

Spring Training is underway down in Clearwater, Florida, with real baseball beginning on Saturday as the Phillies battle the Yankees. As compiled by our minor league contributor, Jay Floyd, here is our full ProspectNation Top 25 list in its entirety. Hope this list sheds some light on what’s being called one of the best farm systems in all of baseball.

  • 9 Comments
 

ProspectNation 2011: #1 Jon Singleton- OF

Posted by Jay Floyd, Thu, February 24, 2011 02:30 PM Comments: 9

One of 2010′s breakout stars in all of minor league baseball was Phillies’ prospect Jonathan Singleton. Drafted in the 8th round of the 2009 amateur draft out of Millikan High School in Long Beach, CA, Singleton was already well regarded within the Philadelphia organization before roughing up South Atlantic League pitching last season.

The left-handed hitting Singleton made his professional debut as a member of the Gulf Coast League Phillies as a 17-year-old after signing with Philadelphia. In 31 games there, Singleton batted .290, slugged 2 homers and drove in 12 runs.

Nicknamed “The Boss”, Singleton really emerged as he helped lead the Class A Lakewood BlueClaws win a second consecutive South Atlantic League title. Singleton actually began the season in extended spring training, but made a massive impact once he was assigned to the Lakewood roster, posting a .423 average in 19 May games.

In 109 regular season games with Lakewood, Singleton posted a .290 batting average with 14 homeruns and 77 RBI with 9 stolen bases.

The steals production could hit the double digit range as he moves up the ranks, but Singleton’s speed is not one of his best assets.

Continue reading ProspectNation 2011: #1 Jon Singleton- OF

  • 9 Comments
 

ProspectNation 2011: #2 Jarred Cosart- RHP

Posted by Jay Floyd, Wed, February 23, 2011 01:50 PM Comments: 5

Righty hurler Jarred Cosart was selected in the 38th round by the Phillies in the 2008 amateur draft. Cosart, who turned 20 years old during the 2010 season, has been extremely impressive since joining the Phillies organization, despite some physical hindrances.

Cosart’s draft position is quite deceiving. He was projected as an early round talent, but the Texas native’s firm commitment to attend the University of Missouri had Major League teams avoiding him throughout the selection process. The Phillies took a gamble later in the draft, then followed Cosart, who played outfield and pitched as an amateur, around as he played rec league baseball during the Summer months. At the signing deadline, the Phillies made a hefty $550,000 offer, that both sides view as an investment, and coaxed Cosart to sign a contract.

In 2009, Cosart, who stands 6-feet-3-inches and weighs around 180 pounds, made his professional debut as a member of the Gulf Coast League Phillies, but was limited to just 24 1/3 innings of action due to a nagging groin injury. In 7 games, 5 of which were starts, Cosart posted a 2-2 record, a 2.22 ERA and an amazing 0.78 WHIP.

The following season, Cosart was in the midst of a tremendous campaign with Class A Lakewood that had him shooting up in the rankings of Phillies prospects, when his season was cut short. This time it was due to an elbow injury. In a late June road start at Delmarva, Cosart went just 2/3 of an inning when he had a rough opening frame and felt some elbow discomfort. After that, Cosart visited Phillies doctors in Philadelphia and was shut down. Cosart later visited with renowned surgeon Dr. James Andrews for a diagnosis and surgery was not required.

Overall, as a member of the Lakewood BlueClaws is 2010, Cosart posted a 7-3 record with a 3.79 ERA and a .224 batting average against in 14 games, which were all starts.

Given the honor of appearing in the MLB Futures Game, which takes place as part of the annual Major League All-star activities, Cosart was unable to attend, due to his ailing elbow.

The pitching repertoire at Cosart’s disposal includes a sharp fastball with movement that ranged from 96-98 MPH during the 2010 season, a curveball that Cosart considers his out pitch and a change up that he has been working to improve. Along with refining his pitches, Cosart was open this year about developing his intelligence on the mound. He worked closely with Lakewood pitching coach Steve Schrenk, on his own off days, to learn hitters’ tendencies and become more of an analyst on the mound.

A power pitcher in the making, Cosart has averaged 9.6 strike outs per 9 innings in his 21 professional outings to date.

Cosart’s work ethic and focus on the future is remarkable. Initially disappointed that the Phillies wished to shut him down last year, due to his elbow issues, Cosart began to appreciate the thought process behind the decision and was eventually pleased that the organization and its doctors chose to be so cautious. He worked hard to complete his rehab work with trainers in Clearwater and was able to rejoin the BlueClaws for their championship series clincher at home, prior to pitching at instructional ball following the postseason.

In December, Cosart said of his time at instructional ball, “There were absolutely no setbacks in instructional league, just a little bit of rust having not thrown to live competition for a few months. The arm felt great, though. And overall, the coaches were very pleased with my outings and, obviously, that the arm felt good.”

Cosart has since followed up a restful off-season by reporting to Spring training roughly four weeks early in order to get in the best possible shape for the upcoming season.

Although he is expected to begin the year on the class High A Clearwater Threshers roster, Cosart has no preference for which level the Phillies may decide he is best suited. He simply wants to make progress by staying injury free, in 2011. As he ascends toward the big leagues, it will be up to Cosart and his body to determine a potential arrival date on the Phillies’ roster.

__________________________________________________________

Jay Floyd is PhoulBallz.com’s minor league contributor. You can read more from Jay by checking out his site, PhoulBallz.com.

  • 5 Comments
 

ProspectNation 2011: #3 Brody Colvin- RHP

Posted by Jay Floyd, Tue, February 22, 2011 01:45 PM Comments: 0

A 7th round draft selection in 2009 out of St. Thomas More High School, in Louisiana, Brody Colvin was originally committed to attend Louisiana State University, but signed with the Phillies at the deadline.

The right-handed Colvin made his professional debut late in 2009, throwing 2 innings in a game for the Gulf Coast League Phillies. He then followed up his brief stint in the GCL by pitching at instructional ball for a month following the season.

In 2010, Colvin spent the year as a member of the Class A Lakewood BlueClaws’ starting rotation. Colvin began the season poorly in the South Atlantic League, as he sported 2-5 record with an 8.40 ERA after a start against at Greenville on May 12th, in which he failed to go 2 full innings. After that rough start, however, Colvin proceeded to rattle off an amazing string of 13 starts in which he posted a 3-1 record, a 1.38 ERA and 68 strike outs in 78 innings.

Colvin’s overall regular season ERA of 3.39 in 27 starts was very strong, especially considering he struggled early in the season and had an 11.15 ERA through his 4 April starts.

His 6-8 regular season record with the BlueClaws doesn’t quite show it, but Colvin proved to be one of the premiere pitchers in the SAL once he straightened himself out. He allowed 0 or 1 runs in 11 different starts in which he did not earn a win during the 2010 season, so it’s clear that Colvin wasn’t blessed with much offensive support at times.

By mid-season, the Phillies had placed an inning limit of 5 per outing on Colvin, in order to keep his innings total for the season down. This preventive measure was perhaps sparked by injuries to Colvin’s staff mates, Jarred Cosart and Nick Hernandez.

Throughout the second half of the season, Colvin worked on his mechanics with Lakewood pitching coach Steve Schrenk. Adjustments made to Colvin’s delivery reduced his tendencies to throw across his body and enabled him to add some velocity to his fastball. Colvin’s performances in 2010 showed an improved efficiency as he worked hard to develop his pitches and his delivery.

Continue reading ProspectNation 2011: #3 Brody Colvin- RHP

  • 0 Comments
 

ProspectNation 2011: #4 Sebastian Valle- Catcher

Posted by Jay Floyd, Mon, February 21, 2011 05:05 PM Comments: 4

Mexico native Sebastian Valle has emerged as a premiere prospect in the Phillies organization. Valle is a promising young catcher who was signed by the Phillies as an amateur free agent in 2006 at the age of 16.

The right-handed hitting Valle began playing professional ball in the Dominican Summer League in 2007. While there, he batted .284 with an OPS of .802 in 54 games.

In 2008, Valle played for the Gulf Coast League Phillies, where he batted .281, hit 2 homers and drove in 18 runs in 48 games. There, he helped guide the GCL Phils’ pitching staff to a league championship.

The following year, Valle, who stands 6-feet-1-inches tall and weighs around 175 pounds, split time between Class A Lakewood and Low A short season Williamsport. In 50 games for the Williamsport Crosscutters, Valle shined, posting a .307 average with 6 homeruns and 40 RBI. Valle’s .866 OPS with the Cutters was impressive as well. The production wasn’t quite the same with the Lakewood BlueClaws, however, as Valle struggled for playing time behind eventual Roy Halladay trade chip Travis d’Arnaud. In 45 games for the eventual SAL champion BlueClaws, Valle batted .223 with 1 HR, 15 RBI and a .644 OPS.

The 2010 season presented a chance to play more for Lakewood and Valle, who entered the season at 19 years of age, produced very solid numbers, as one of the leaders of the team’s offense. Valle began the year a bit slow, notching just a single homerun in his first 40 games. Once he heated up, though, Valle hit 8 homers over the next 18 games and kept it going for the remainder of the year. In 117 regular season games, Valle posted a .255 batting average, mashed a team leading 16 homers and knocked in 74 runs to help his club lock down a second consecutive South Atlantic League title.

Valle spent his off-season playing for his hometown Los Mochis Caneros in the Mexican Winter League. In order to save his knees for his more important gig in the Phillies system, Valle spent some time playing the outfield. Coming up as a youth player, Valle also played third base and pitched.

The now 20-year-old Valle saw a dip in batting average this past year, as he worked closely with his hitting coach Greg Legg on hitting pitches the other way. Despite his generally fluid swing, Valle adjusted his approach at times. He saw his best success when he kept things simple by keeping his front shoulder down and his head on the ball. As the season went on and Valle ironed out the things he was working to improve, along with Legg and his manager Mark Parent, his production became more reliable.

With a low walk rate of 5.6% in 2010, Valle will need to focus on being less aggressive at the plate and taking more pitches in order to become a more complete offensive threat.

Defensively, Valle is developing at a steady rate and was a clear leader for the strong BlueClaws pitching staff that impressed so many scouts, media members and executives last season. Lakewood pitchers repeatedly credited Valle, during the 2010 season, with helping them excel. His terrific rapport with his hurlers and knowledge of each pitchers’ strengths enabled him to direct the outstanding group of young fireballers toward a championship.

Look for Valle to climb the minor league ladder aside his army of well regarded hurlers that include Trevor May, Jarred Cosart, Brody Colvin and Jonathan Pettibone. Each of those men are expected to begin the 2011 season in High A Level Clearwater, where they’ll very likely take the Florida State League by storm and contend for another postseason crown.

In the long term, Valle projects to be a Major League catcher and has the power potential to become a highly sought after prospect in the meantime.

_______________________________________________________

Jay Floyd is PhilliesNation’s minor league contributor.  To read more from Jay, check out his site, PhoulBallz.com.

  • 4 Comments
 

ProspectNation 2011: #5 Justin De Fratus- RHP

Posted by Jay Floyd, Sat, February 19, 2011 02:00 PM Comments: 4

Right-handed pitcher Justin De Fratus, a California native, who was drafted in the 11th round in the 2007 amateur draft, has shown steady progression since signing his first professional contract with the Phillies.

In 2007, as a member of the rookie level Gulf Coast League Phillies, De Fratus posted a 2-3 record with a 4.30 ERA and a .273 batting average against in 10 games, 8 of which were starts.

The following season, De Fratus pitched with the short season Low A Williamsport Crosscutters. In 14 games as a starter, the man known to his brothers and friends as J-Bone went 6-5 with a 3.67 ERA and a .260 batting average against.

In 2009, De Fratus was a key piece of the Class A Lakewood BlueClaws pitching staff, taking on both starting and relief duties. In 36 games (12 starts) that season, De Fratus went 5-6 with 3 saves, a 3.19 ERA and a .258 batting average against.

After beginning the 2010 regular season with High-A level Clearwater and posting a 2-0 record with 15 saves and a 1.79 ERA in 29 games, De Fratus was promoted to Double A Reading in early July. Over the last two months of the season, as a member of the R-Phils, he went 1-0 with 6 saves and a 2.19 ERA in 20 games. Combined at the two levels and pitching exclusively out of the bullpen, opponents batted .208 against De Fratus.

De Fratus stayed hot throughout the off-season, pitching for Team USA in the Pan-American qualifiers held in Puerto Rico, helping the Americans finish with a 9-1 record. He also posted exceptional statistics for the Mesa Solar Sox in the Arizona Fall League Continue reading ProspectNation 2011: #5 Justin De Fratus- RHP

  • 4 Comments
 

ProspectNation 2011: #6 Trevor May- RHP

Posted by Jay Floyd, Thu, February 17, 2011 11:30 AM Comments: 12

Washington state native Trevor May appeared to be on an extremely fast track to the big leagues after two season in the Phillies’ system. However, a rough patch in High A ball followed by a demotion seemed to bring May back down to Earth a bit and served as somewhat of a reality check. Now, following improvements in the second half of his 2010 season, May seems to be back on the rise.

A 4th round draft choice in 2008 out of Kelso High School, May has won minor league championships in each of his three seasons as a pro in the Phillies system.

After signing with Philadelphia, May helped lead the rookie level Gulf Coast League Phillies to their league title in 2008. In 5 regular season games in the GCL, May went 1-1 and had a 3.75 ERA.

The right-handed May began the 2009 season in extended spring training then later was assigned to Class A Lakewood and swiftly became one of the Phillies top rated pitching prospects by blazing through opposing batters with a 4-1 record and a 2.56 ERA in 15 starts. May also struck out 95 batters in 77 1/3 innings pitched en route to the BlueClaws’ South Atlantic League title.

May began his 2010 campaign with High A level Clearwater, but struggled with his grip in Florida’s humidity and had great difficulty throwing strikes, which resulted in an uncharacteristically high 61 walked batters in 70 innings. Overall with Clearwater, May posted a 5-5 record with a 5.01 ERA in 16 games, 14 of which were starts.

Phillies assistant general manager in charge of player development Chuck LaMar chose to return May to Lakewood, where he quickly bounced back and received a boost in his confidence, returning to excellent form. In 11 regular season games, May went 7-3 with a 2.91 ERA. On July 27th at Delmarva he struck out 14 batters to tie a team record for strike outs in a game.

May again helped lock down a Sally League title for the BlueClaws. In the 2010 postseason May was strong, whiffing 13 and walking 1 in 6 2/3 shutout innings against the Hickory Crawdads in the opening round to earn a win. In Game 1 of the championship round against the Greenville Drive, May gave up a run and struck out 8 over 5 innings and took a loss. The BlueClaws locked down the SAL title before May was needed in game 5.

Combined in two postseasons with Lakewood, May, who stands 6-feet-5-inches tall and is listed at 215 pounds but likely weighs more, allowed just 1 run in 22 2/3 innings.

The 21-year-old’s pitch repertoire consists of a heavy fastball that steadily reaches the mid-90′s, a sharp curveball and a change up that has come along nicely since May began throwing it in 2009. Considered a power pitcher at times, May has tried to work some finesse into his game with placement and by using each pitch in any given count. Despite that though, his strike out rates have stayed high throughout his three pro seasons, as May has averaged 11.55 strike outs per 9 innings in his minor league career, and he averaged 12.13 strike outs per 9 innings in 2010.

The Phillies could wish to take their time moving May upward in the system, but it will ultimately depend on May’s drive. If May continues to mature and learns to cope with the varying climates he’ll have to deal with at higher levels, he could be in consideration to break into the big leagues in a couple years.

___________________________________________________________

Jay Floyd is PhilliesNation’s minor league contributor.  You can read more from Jay by checking out his site, PhoulBallz.com.

  • 12 Comments
 

ProspectNation 2011: #7 Jiwan James- OF

Posted by Jay Floyd, Tue, February 15, 2011 07:00 AM Comments: 2

Switch-hitting Phillies prospect Jiwan James earned plenty of recognition last season, as he set the Class A Lakewood hitting streak record at 24 straight games and led the team in runs scored with 85. James, who will turn 22 years old in April, has reported early to Clearwater, well ahead of the March 1st report date for minor league spring training camp.

Drafted out of high school as a pitcher in the 22nd round of the 2007 amateur draft, James made the switch to the outfield in 2009 where he played in 30 games with the short season Williamsport Crosscutters. As a member of the Cutters, James batted .264 with a homer and 13 RBI. The positional switch was necessary due to a lingering arm issue that James dealt with during 2008.

In 2010, while helping the Lakewood BlueClaws lock down a second straight South Atlantic League title, James, who stands 6-feet-4-inches tall and weighs around 185 pounds, shined batting at the top of the order in manager Mark Parent’s lineup. In the longest season of his career, James posted a .270 average with 26 doubles, 6 triples, 5 homers and 64 RBI in 133 games played.

James is naturally a left-handed hitter and feels more comfortable from that side, as shown by his 2010 season splits- .281 avg/.719 OPS vs. righty hurlers, .238 avg/.598 OPS vs. lefty hurlers.

Fatigue seemed to be a factor for James, down the stretch, as he went from a .361 average in July to a .220 batting average in 54 regular season games after July and began the postseason with a 1-for-16 slump, before collecting three hits in game 2 of the SAL championship series against Greenville. As James gets used to playing such lengthy campaigns, it’s not likely that his production will continue to suffer as time goes. Instead he will develop his strength and stamina to go along with his adaptive athleticism.

Areas of his game that James should focus on include his pitch recognition and his stolen base percentage. James struck out 132 times in 133 games during the 2010 regular season. As he learns to pick up opposing pitchers’ off-speed pitches and improves his ability to make contact, his offensive production will surely receive a huge boost. His .347 batting average on balls in play, during the 2010 regular season, is evidence of that.

In addition, James stole 33 bases with Lakewood, but was caught 20 times. As players move up to higher levels, coaches will assist more with scouting the opposing battery and augment stolen base success for their players. The extra help will benefit James, whose speed is one of his assets.

Among James’ other tools are a respectable throwing arm and his tremendous defensive range in centerfield. With his long strides, James reaches balls hit into the gaps, corrals balls hit well over his head, reaches batted balls in front of him and successfully makes diving catches about as easily as he schools his teammates in poker during downtime.

Lakewood’s hitting coach and longtime member of the Phillies’ developmental staff Greg Legg does not view James as a gamble. Instead, Legg sees a load of potential in the toolsy lead-off man. Asked about the Florida native, James, late last season, Legg stated, “(Jiwan)’s a pillar of consistency. He pays attention to the game. I think he’s only going to get better. As time goes on, he’s going to learn the strike zone better, he’s going to get stronger, he’s going to get more power. He’s got a real bright future. When he gets his man-strength, look out!”

Indeed we will look out for Jiwan James, as the highly athletic youngster is expected to move up to High A level Clearwater this season to play in the Florida State League. There’s definitely much hard work ahead for James if he is to reach the highest level of baseball. The progress he achieves on the way there will determine if he can stick around and what role he will play, once he reaches the big leagues.

_________________________________________________________

Jay Floyd is PhilliesNation’s minor league contributor. You can read more from Jay by checking out his site, PhoulBallz.com.

  • 2 Comments
 

ProspectNation 2011: #8 Austin Hyatt- RHP

Posted by Jay Floyd, Fri, February 11, 2011 03:15 PM Comments: 4

Previously drafted by the Braves out of high school, Austin Hyatt was selected as a 15th round draft choice by the Phillies in 2009, having attended the University of Alabama where he pitched as a starter.

In his senior season with Alabama, Hyatt posted an 8-3 record with a 3.76 ERA in 15 games in the tough Southeastern Conference before signing his first professional contract with the Phils.

Almost immediately, Hyatt began his pro career with the short season Williamsport Crosscutters of the New York-Penn League. The right-hander dominated as a 23-year-old, posting a 3-0 record with a 0.66 ERA and a .141 batting average against in 17 games, 5 of which were starts. With Williamsport, Hyatt struck out a beastly 81 batters in 54 1/3 innings.

The tremendous efforts upon his arrival in the Phillies organization earned Hyatt a bump up to Class A Lakewood where he served as the BlueClaws’ set up man for the team’s postseason run en route to the South Atlantic League title. Hyatt pitched in all 5 Lakewood wins in the 2009 postseason without allowing a run.

As a member of the High A level Clearwater Threshers in 2010, Hyatt posted an 11-5 record with a 3.04 ERA and a .220 batting average against in 23 games, 21 of which he started. In 124 1/3 innings in the Florida State League, Hyatt struck out 156 batters and walked just 35.

In one May start against Jupiter (Marlins affiliate), Hyatt forced the baseball world to take notice of his talents, as he struck out a career high 14 batters, while allowing just 1 hit over 8 innings.

Over Hyatt’s final 10 starts with the Threshers, he won 5 and lost none, while notching an astounding 0.83 ERA.

The 6’2″, 180-pounder was named the Florida State League’s pitcher of the year for his exceptional efforts in 2010, despite being promoted to Double A Reading in early August.

With Reading, Hyatt started 4 games, going 1-0 with a 4.91 ERA and a .247 batting average against. While in Double A, Hyatt added more solid strike out numbers, posting 25 K’s in 22 innings.

Now 24 years old, Hyatt’s pitch repertoire includes a fastball that tops out in the mid-90′s and a very good change up that has movement. Hyatt’s third pitch is a slider that he worked to gain more confidence in last season. The success of the slider, among other factors, could determine Hyatt’s future status, whether as a starter or a reliever.

Expect to see Hyatt back in Reading in 2011.  His future with the Phillies does not seem to be as a starter at this point. With considerable depth among starting pitchers at the Major League level (the starting 5 locked in, with Kyle Kendrick and Vance Worley on standby, in case they are needed), the Phillies could likely move Hyatt back to a relief role, going forward, with hopes he will continue to progress quickly. If Hyatt can take some strides and impress the higher ups this year, fans could see the Georgia native insert himself into the conversation with other relievers the team has as bullpen options.

_______________________________________________________

Jay Floyd is PhilliesNation’s minor league insider. You can check out more content from Jay by visiting his site, PhoulBallz.com.

  • 4 Comments
 

ProspectNation 2011: #9 Jesse Biddle- LHP

Posted by Jay Floyd, Thu, February 10, 2011 01:46 PM Comments: 9

Last year’s first round draft pick, Jesse Biddle, moved up the Phillies’ prospect rankings in a hurry once he debuted in the pros. The highly regarded left-handed hurler was the Phils’ target from the jump in last season’s amateur draft.

Biddle, a Philadelphia native and life-long Phillies fan, has had the goal of pitching for the Phillies since he was 12 years old. And it is an ambition that Biddle’s always taken seriously, as he wants baseball to be his life.

After he began getting attention in high school and received visits from scouts that represented other professional organizations, Biddle remained a Phillies fan, attending World Series games in both 2008 and 2009. Biddle cites another Phillies number 1 draft choice, current starting lefty pitcher Cole Hamels, as someone he looked up to prior to signing his first pro contract.

“I went to game 5 of the 2008 World Series, where Cole Hamels pitched in the rain. It was the game that got delayed, the two-parter. I went to both parts. I have to say, it was one of the most incredible moments of my life. I saw him, and I saw the way he handled it and the way he won MVP and I just thought, ‘That’s what I want to do.’ It was incredible,” Biddle said in an interview last week.

As a senior in high school, at Philadelphia’s Germantown Friends School, Biddle went 9-2 with a save and a 1.06 ERA. Even more impressive, Biddle struck out an astounding 140 batters in 59 1/3 innings.

Prior to the draft, Biddle committed to play for the University of Oregon. However, faced with the opportunity to fulfill a dream that he’d had since little league, Biddle decided to sign with the Phillies rather than attend college. He weighed his options and was confident that he could handle professional baseball, so the decision was easy.

Now 19 years old, Biddle’s best pitch is his fastball which has some solid movement and reaches the mid-90′s. Biddle also throws a curveball that will improve as he throws it more in the minor leagues. He had gotten away from using the curve, despite his high comfort level with it, after some scouts had told him it might hurt his draft position. He began using a slider as his breaking pitch. The Phillies, however, like Biddle’s curve and he has brought it back to his pitch repertoire in place of the slider. Also in the mix is a change up that Biddle says he will work hard to improve, as he didn’t use it much in high school, where a slower pitch would only have helped opposing batters’ timing.

The 6’4″, 245 pounder, Biddle, began his career with the Gulf Coast League Phillies, where he posted a 3-1 record and a 4.32 ERA with a complete game shutout and 41 strike outs in 33 1/3 innings (9 starts). Prior to the GCL playoffs, Biddle was promoted and he wrapped up his first pro season with 3 starts as a member of the low Class A Williamsport Crosscutters. In those games, Biddle went 1-0 and held opponents to a .152 batting average. One statistic of concern with the Cutters, though, was his strike out to walk ratio…9 K’s, 11 walks in 10 1/3 innings.

The transition, from high school competition to rookie league match ups, wasn’t as difficult as Biddle expected. Although, he feels the umpires and their smaller strike zones were the biggest thing he needed to adjust to. As Biddle gains more experience, high walk totals should be a thing of the past.

Expect Biddle to see action as a member of the Class A Lakewood BlueClaws in the South Atlantic League this coming season. It’s not a lock that Biddle will begin the season on the defending league champs’ opening day roster. The Phillies’ method of holding back younger talent at extended spring training, during April, proved extremely successful for the likes of Julio Rodriguez and Jonathan Singleton in 2010. Jesse Biddle may follow suit this year as a player who waits until May to make his debut with Lakewood.

_________________________________________________________

Jay Floyd is PhilliesNation’s minor league contributor.  You can read more from Jay by checking out his site, PhoulBallz.com.

  • 9 Comments
 
Previous Page